Sunday, September 25, 2016

Musings On Iraq In The News


Saturday, September 24, 2016

US Used 90s UN Weapons Inspectors To Spy On Iraq


After the Gulf War when the United Nations ordered inspectors into Iraq to destroy its weapons of mass destruction, missile and nuclear programs Saddam would often demand that the U.S. and British members of the teams be removed. Baghdad accused those people of being spies for their respective governments. As it turned out the Americans were using the inspections to collect intelligence on Iraq. For example, the U.S. installed eavesdropping devices into the U.N. communication network to tap into the Iraqi military. In March 1996 when the inspectors installed video cameras at suspected sites to monitor them, the Americans placed their own devices at those locations as well. The deputy director of the inspections Charles Duelfer was told about the spy program so that it would not be interfered with, but the U.N. itself was never informed. Espionage was a major issue for the Iraqis, and one of the reasons why they were opposed to letting the U.N. personnel into their classified facilities. While it was wrong to think that the team members themselves were spies, they were right that America was taking advantage of the situation. Washington felt it more important to collect information on Saddam’s military and covert programs then maintain the integrity of the inspection process.

SOURCES

Gellman, Barton, “U.S. Spied On Iraqi Military Via U.N.,” Washington Post, 3/2/99

Friday, September 23, 2016

Iran Says No To Kurds’ Independence From Iraq


On May 5, 2016 an editorial was published in the Washington Post entitled “Kurdistan deserves an amicable divorce from Baghdad” by Masrour Barzani, the son of the Kurdish president Massoud Barzani. The article said that the Kurdistan Region would consult with Iran and other regional countries on the proposed independence referendum. The proposal to break away from Iraq was immediately rejected by the Iranian Foreign Ministry. The ministry’s spokesman Jaberi Ansari told the press that Tehran stands for the unity of Iraq. He suggested that Iraqi leaders get together and focus upon the real dangers that face the country like the Islamic State. Iran’s opposition to the Kurdish independence was re-iterated in September. Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister Hussein Jaber Ansari was quoted as saying that Kurdish independence would lead to regional instability, the division of other countries, and more wars. Kurdistan will eventually have its sovereignty, but it will take years of negotiations with Baghdad, Syria, Iran and Turkey. Without some kind of regional agreement the existence of the new country could be threatened. Ironically, right now no one in the area is ready to see the Kurds leave except some of Iraq’s ruling parties that are angered by the Kurds moves on issues such as oil, the disputed territories, the budget, etc.

SOURCES

Barzani, Masrour, “Kurdistan deserves an amicable divorce from Baghdad,” Washington Post, 5/5/16

eKurd, “Iran rejects Masour Barzani’s remarks over Iraqi Kurdistan independence,” 5/9/16
- “Referendum on Iraqi Kurdistan independence paves way for regional war: Iranian official,” 9/18/16

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Iraq Sacks Its Finance Minister


For the second time in two months Iraq’s parliament has sacked a minister. On September 21, 2016 Finance Minister Hoshyar Zebari was dismissed after 158 parliamentarians voted to remove him versus 77 against. Zebari was called before parliament several weeks earlier for questioning over corruption charges. His responses were considered inadequate leading to his no confidence vote. Leading the charge to get rid of him was MP Haitham al-Jabouri of the Dawa Party. This was part of former prime minister Nouri al-Maliki’s attempt to undermine Premier Haidar Abadi’s government.

Maliki was able to play upon divisions within the Kurdish alliance and dislike of the list to get rid of Zebari. First, President Massoud Barzani has stayed in office after his term expired causing dissension in Kurdistan. The Change party demanded reforms in return for extending Barzani’s term. The president responded by unilaterally dismissing Change’s ministers and barring the speaker of the Kurdistan Regional Government’s parliament from entering Irbil who was also a member of Change. That led Change and the Patriotic Union of Kurdistan (PUK) to form a new political alliance. The Kurdish Islamic parties have been unhappy with Barzani’s moves as well. That led those groups to vote against Zebari in parliament. Second, as Kirk Sowell of Inside Iraqi Politics pointed out President Barzani is one of the most unpopular politicians in Iraq. Unhappiness with Maliki’s time in office led Barzani to write off relations with Baghdad. Since then he has increasingly talked about Kurdish independence, his party has called Iraq a failed state, has moved towards independent oil exports, while at the same time complaining that the central government has not shared international military aid with the KRG and demanded its share of the budget. These moves and others have all angered many Arab politicians. Zebari is not only a member of Barzani’s KDP, but the president’s uncle as well making him a prime target. Together this allowed Maliki’s operatives to garner enough votes to oust the finance minister.

This is another big victory for Maliki and a hit for Abadi. In August Defense Minister Khalid al-Obeidi failed a no confidence vote over corruption charges. Both the defense and finance ministers were important to Abadi’s government. When Maliki was in office he was masterful at playing divide and conquer allowing him to take on nearly every faction in Iraq. He is doing the same now. Maliki’s group was able to play upon the divisions within the two main Sunni parties, the Iraqi Islamic Party and Mutahidun to sack Obeidi. He now played upon the Kurds new splits to do the same to Zebari. That doesn’t mean that Maliki will be able to put the numbers together to get rid of other ministers, but it does open the door to it. Abadi already came into office in a weak position, and now his legs are being further cut out from under him.

SOURCES

AIN, “The formation of a coalition featuring a unified Kurdish Patriotic Union and Change,” 9/10/16

Anagnostos, Emily, “Iraq’s Parliament Ousts Kurdish Finance Minister,” Institute for the Study of War, 9/21/16

Iraq News Network, “Zebari accused al-Maliki of moving interrogations to hit Abadi,” 8/30/16

Iraq Oil Report, “Uncertainty after Parliament ousts Iraq’s finance minister,” 9/21/16

Al Mada, “Zebari: personal targeting misleading statements adopted,” 8/25/16

Rudaw, “Iraq’s finance minister likely to face confidence vote in parliament,” 8/28/16

Sotaliraq, “Image..Al-Jabouri after the dismissal of Zebari,” 9/21/16

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Iraq Suppressed Deaths To Make PM Maliki Look Good


With the success of the Surge casualties in Iraq started a steady decline in the second half of 2007 that continued for the next several years. The figures released by the Iraqi government however, were much lower than the others. That was on purpose after a high ranking official at the Health Ministry ordered casualty figures to be cut in half to support Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki.

Starting in September 2007 the fatality figures issued by the Iraqi government, and especially the Health Ministry, took a dramatic drop. In August 2007, the Interior, Defense, and Health ministries reported that 1,856 people had died in Iraq that month. (1) The next month there were 884 killed, (2) 758 in October, (3) 538 in November, (4) and 568 in December. From February to April 2008 there was a spike in deaths due to the operations against the Mahdi Army in Basra, Maysan, and Baghdad, but then the numbers continued their downward trajectory reaching a low of 316 in December. (5) 

The trend that Baghdad’s statistics followed was the same as Iraq Body Count (IBC), the United Nations and others, the issue was that they were so much lower than the rest. In January 2008 for instance, the Interior, Defense, and Health ministries claimed 541 dead versus 858 by Iraq Body Count, and 1,064 by the United Nations. That gap between the government’s figures and the IBC’s and U.N.’s continued throughout the year. In May the Health Ministry had 505 dead, (6) while IBC had 914 and the U.N. 1,000. For all of 2008, the Iraqi authorities reported 6,448 deaths minus August when no figures could be found. In comparison, IBC had 9,567 killed for that period, and the U.N. 10,908. The Iraqi government and U.N. included all fatalities from civilians, police, soldiers, and sahwa, while the Iraq Body Count did not include soldiers. The difference was 3,000-4,000. It turned out that was done on purpose.

In late 2007 the word was sent out to reduce the monthly casualty figures to boost the standing of Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. The order came from Dr. Adil Mohsin Khazali, the Health Ministry’s long time inspector general, and a member of Maliki’s Dawa Party. In September 2007 he told Baghdad’s hospitals to cut their numbers in half to improve the standing of the premier. The capital was the center of the fighting in the country, so having the medical centers there reduce their monthly statistics would cut the overall numbers significantly. That explains why the Iraqi figures were always several hundred lower than IBC and U.N.’s. That trend would continue for years, and is being repeated in the present day. After the battles of Tikrit, Ramadi, Fallujah, etc. no official numbers were released for how many members of the Iraqi forces were killed or wounded. Like before, the goal is to promote the successes of the government’s security plans.

Comparison Of Iraq Death Counts
Month
Iraqi Govt
Iraq Body Count
U.N.
Aug 07
1,856 (IDH)
2,481
-
Sep
884 (H)
1,387
-
Oct
758 (H)
1,324
-
Nov
538 (G)
1,124
-
Dec
568 (IDH)
996
-
Jan 08
541(IDH)
858
1,064
Feb
721(IDH)
1,092
1,304
Mar
1,270 (IDH)
1,667
2,011
Apr
1,082 (IDH)
1,315
1,869
May
505 (H)
914
1,000
Jun
448 (H)
750
821
Jul
465 (IH)
639
688
Aug
?
704
682
Sep
440 (IDH)
612
625
Oct
320 (IDH)
594
559
Nov
340 (IDH)
540
463
Dec
316 (IDH)
586
504
(I) – Interior, (D) – Defense, (H) – Health, (G) - Govt

FOOTNOTES

1. Agence France Presse, “Iraq violence surges in February,” 3/1/08

2. Tait, Paul, “Civilian deaths in Iraq halve in Sept: government,” Reuters, 10/1/07

3. Parker, Ned, “Iraqi civilian deaths plunge,” Los Angeles Times, 11/1/07

4. Al Jazeera.net, “Returning Iraqis pose new challenge,” 12/6/07

5. Agence France Presse, “Iraq Hails Lowest Monthly Death Toll in Three Years,” 1/2/09

6. Black, Ian, “Jordan appoints ambassador to Iraq after five-year absence,” Guardian, 7/2/08

SOURCES

Agence France Presse, “Iraq Hails Lowest Monthly Death Toll in Three Years,” 1/2/09
-“Iraq violence surges in February,” 3/1/08
- “Iraqi Deaths Up in October in Blow to US ‘Surge,’” 11/2/07

Black, Ian, “Jordan appoints ambassador to Iraq after five-year absence,” Guardian, 7/2/08

Faraj, Salam, “Iraqi MPs, Sadr meet in Iran in bid to end clashes,” Agence France Presse, 5/1/08

Fischer, Hannah, “Iraqi Civilian Deaths Estimates,” Congressional Research Service, 9/5/07

Glanz, James, “Civilian Death Toll Falls in Baghdad but Rises Across Iraq,” New York Times, 9/2/07

Gordon, Michael and Trainor, General Bernard, The Endgame, The Inside Story Of The Struggle For Iraq, From George W. Bush To Barack Obama, New York, Pantheon, 2012

Iraq Body Count, “Documented civilian deaths from violence”

Al Jazeera.net, “Returning Iraqis pose new challenge,” 12/6/07

Korb, Lawrence Biddle, Stephen, “Violence by the Numbers in Iraq: Sound Data or Shaky Statistics?” Council on Foreign Relations, 9/25/07

Mulrine, Anna, “Quieting Mean Streets,” U.S. News & World Report, 10/22/07

Parker, Ned, “Iraqi civilian deaths plunge,” Los Angeles Times, 11/1/07

Parker, Ned and Spiegel, Peter, “A combat troop withdrawal from Iraq?” Los Angeles Times, 8/1/08

Partlow, Joshua and Nouri, Naseer, “In Iraq, a Lull or Hopeful Trend?” Washington Post, 11/2/07

Raghavan, Sudarsan, “Deaths of Iraqis in July Lower Than in May, June,” Washington Post, 8/2/08

Reid, Robert, “Britain Delays Cutting Troops in Iraq,” Associated Press, 4/1/08

Reuters, “Iraq civilian death toll up, U.S. deaths down,” 12/1/08

Alsumaria, “Iraq death toll lowest since five years,” 2/2/09
- “Iraq violence kills 320 people in October,” 11/1/08

Susman, Tina, “Troop buildup fails to reconcile Iraq,” Los Angeles Times, 9/4/07
- “U.S. defends sectarian death figures,” Los Angeles Times, 9/13/07

Tait, Paul, “Civilian deaths in Iraq halve in Sept: government,” Reuters, 10/1/07

United States Commission on International Religious Freedom, December 2008

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

More Returns Leads To Slight Decline In Displaced In Iraq


Iraq witnessed another slight dip in the number of displaced. In August 2016 the International Organization of Migration registered 3,344,154 people. That was down from 3,369,252 the month before. There were many more that did not sign up with the government and non-governmental organizations.

The cause for the decline was a number of returns in Anbar and Baghdad. In the former almost 9,000 people went back to their homes, and in the latter over 44,000 returned mostly going back to Anbar. Roughly 2,000 also left Kirkuk and Dohuk. Salahaddin saw 31,590 new displaced, largely from Shirqat in the northern section of the province and from Hawija in southern Kirkuk, both of which are still under Islamic State control. In total, 852,390 people were recorded as returns in August, the largest amount so far in 2016. As more territory is freed from the militants more people will go back. On the other hand, with the Mosul offensive approaching the United Nations and others are expecting tens of thousands of people to flee.

Anbar was home to the most displaced with 627,078. That was followed by 476,988 people in Baghdad, 397,584 in Dohuk, 394,728 in Irbil, 380,034 in Kirkuk, 295,266 in Ninewa, 240,438 in Salahaddin, 166,032 in Sulaymaniya, 88,530 in Diyala, 68,262 in Karbala, 58,654 in Najaf, 52,314 in Babil, 24,816 in Wasit, 24,042 in Qadisiyah, 10,308, in Basra, 8,862 in Dhi Qar, 6,042 in Maysan, and 4,806 in Muthanna. Most of the war in Iraq has been in the west, center and north, which was where most of the displaced fled. The south took in many people in 2014, mostly from Anbar, but has not received many since then.

Anbar was the largest source of displaced people. 42% of the total, 1,389,078 came from that governorate. There were also 1,170,570 from Ninewa, 444,258 from Salahaddin, 134,352 from Kirkuk, 122,130 from Diyala, 48,228 from Baghdad, 31,314 from Babil, and 4,224 from Irbil. Ninewa, Salahaddin, Kirkuk and Diyala are all major battlefields. Most of the displaced from Baghdad came from the outer towns where most of the violence takes place. Babil has not had any fighting for months, but Jurf al-Sakhr was completely emptied of its inhabitants since it was liberated and there is no sign that they will be allowed back any time soon. Finally, there has been clashes in southern Irbil.

Displaced In Iraq 2016
Jan 3,320,286
Feb 3,343,776
Mar 3,417,768
Apr 3,332,820
May 3,306,258
Jun 3,320,274
Jul 3,369,252
Aug 3,344,154

Total Returns By Month 2016
January 534,048
February 557,400
March 553,104
April 656,778
May 726,336
June 754,158
July 796,758
August 852,390

Displaced By Province August 2016
Anbar 627,078
Baghdad 476,988
Dohuk 397,584
Irbil 394,728
Kirkuk 380,034
Ninewa 295,266
Salahaddin 240,438
Sulaymaniya 166,032
Diyala 88,530
Karbala 68,262
Najaf 58,654
Babil 52,314
Wasit 24,816
Qadisiyah 24,042
Basra 10,308
Dhi Qar 8,862
Maysan 6,042
Muthanna 4,806

Origins Of Displaced
Anbar 1,389,078 42% of total
Ninewa 1,170,570 35%
Salahaddin 444,258 13%
Kirkuk 134,3524%
Diyala 122,130 4%
Baghdad 48,228 1%
Babil 31,314 1%
Irbil 4,224 0%

Change In Displaced By Province From July to August 2016
Salahaddin 208,848 to 240,438 + 15%
Irbil 391,302 to 394,728 +1%
Ninewa 292,026 to 295,266 +1%
Kirkuk 381,858 to 380,034 0%
Dohuk 398,274 to 397,534 0%
Anbar 635,898 to 627,078 -1%
Baghdad 521,700 to 476,988 -9%

Monday, September 19, 2016

Security In Iraq, Sep 8-14, 2016


There was a continued ebb and flow in violence in Iraq. In the middle of August 2016 there was a surge in incidents, but that has subsided in September. Casualties have also widely fluctuated.

From September 8-14, 2016 there were 125 incidents. That was roughly the same as the 119 recorded the week before, and the 134 incidents from August 22-28. Incidents regularly go up and down in Iraq for a number of reasons. Sometimes the Islamic State is fighting back against government offensives. Sometimes it picks up its terrorist campaign in Baghdad or its executions in Kirkuk and Salahaddin. Overall, violence has been going down this year.

Casualties dropped considerably from the first to second week of the month. In the first week there were 722 dead and wounded. That went down to 197 killed and 313 injured the second week. 3 Peshmerga, 4 Sahwa, 5 Hashd, 9 members of the Iraqi Security Forces (ISF), and 176 civilians lost their lives. 4 Sahwa, 10 ISF, 11 Hashd, 12 Peshmerga, and 274 civilians were injured. As usual Baghdad was the deadliest province with 121 killed, followed by 37 in Kirkuk, 13 in Anbar, 11 in Diyala, 8 in Salahaddin, 6 in Anbar, and 1in Basra. Casualties are chronically under reported in Iraq. The government does not release figures for major battles and many attacks outside of Baghdad do not get into the media.

The 13 attacks reported in Anbar were spread across the province. Haditha and Rutba in the west and Thar Thar in the west were assaulted five times. There were also attacks in the Ramadi and Fallujah areas. Some of those were well planned, but failed operations against police stations and army bases. Since the government is suppressing its losses only 6 deaths and 2 injured were recorded during the week.

As the Islamic State attempts to regroup from its territorial losses it has increased its terrorist campaign in Baghdad to show that it is still active and to undermine the government. There are also vigilantes, criminals, and militias active in the province as well. From September 8-14 there were 66 incidents in the capital leading to 121 dead and 272 wounded. Most of that violence occurred in the south with 24 incidents, along with 15 in the east, 14 in the north, 12 in the west, and 1 in the center. At the end of August the government carried out sweeps through Arab Jabour, a rural town in the south and Tarmiya in the outer north. That had little affect, as there was a grenade attack, and three IEDs in those two locations the second week of September. The deadliest attack overall in the province was a suicide bombing followed by a car bomb at a mall in the east that left 40 dead and 60 injured. 2 other suicide bombers were killed before reaching their targets.

Violence In Baghdad, Sep 8-14, 2016
Center: 1 – 1 Suicide Bomber Killed
East: 14 – 1 Suicide Bomber, 1 Suicide Car Bomb, 1 Grenade, 1 Shooting/Robbery, 1 Sticky Bomb,
2 Robberies, 2 IEDs, 6 Shootings
Outer East: 1 – 1 IED
North: 2 – 1 Sticky Bomb, 1 IED
Outer North: 12 – 1 Suicide Bomber killed, 1 Kidnapping, 2 Shootings, 8 IEDs
South: 11 – 1 Sticky Bomb, 1 Grenade, 2 Kidnappings, 3 IEDs, 4 Shootings
Outer South: 13 – 1 Grenade, 1 Robbery, 2 Shootings, 9 IEDs
West: 6 – 1 Shooting/Kidnapping, 1 Shooting/Robbery, 1 Sound Bomb, 3 IEDs
Outer West: 6 – 1 Kidnapping, 1 Robbery, 4 IEDs

Diyala was averaging nearly two incidents per day from May to July, but that suddenly dropped off in August. During the second week of September IS picked up its operations again with 13 total incidents. That included a suicide car bomb that was destroyed and a suicide bomber that was arrested, both in Khalis. The rest were the regularly mix of IEDs and shootings. Those led to 11 dead and 11 wounded.

Almost all of the casualties recorded in Kirkuk during the week were displaced people trying to escape the Islamic State. 29 people were killed and 16 wounded by IEDs as they attempted to flee the control of the insurgents. Another 8 bodies were found and 2 Peshmerga were wounded while on patrol by a bomb.

There was a mix of attacks, executions, and a deadly Coalition air strike in Ninewa. An air raid in the Tal Afar district was blamed for the death of two civilians and five injured. In Mosul, IS executed 12 people. The insurgents also attacked both the ISF and Peshmerga.

Ever since IS seized Ramadi in the middle of 2015 attacks have declined in Salahaddin. Only four incidents were recorded from September 8-14, the fewest in years.

Car Bombs have been at a low level since the end of the Islamic State’s spring offensive. There was only one successful bombing during the week, which occurred in Baghdad. 21 more were reported destroyed with 1 in Diyala, 2 in Anbar, 2 in Salahaddin, and 16 in Ninewa.

Violence In Iraq 2016
Date
Incidents
Dead
Wounded
Jan 1-7
179
866
476
Jan 8-14
168
560
480
Jan 15-21
166
400
335
Jan 22-28
154
457
361
Jan 29-31
56
135
334
JAN
723
2,418
1,986
Feb 1-7
184
626
355
Feb 8-14
150
259
375
Feb 15-21
162
400
293
Feb 22-29
161
400
701
FEB
657
1,685
1,724
Mar 1-7
185
351
484
Mar 8-14
169
477
517
Mar 15-21
133
419
510
Mar 22-28
141
245
432
Mar 29-31
53
192
152
MAR
681
1,684
2,095
Apr 1-7
157
398
508
Apr 8-14
146
361
443
Apr 15-21
130
531
300
Apr 22-28
165
480
532
Apr 29-30
31
65
121
APR
629
1,835
1,904
May 1-7
164
386
422
May 8-14
147
407
687
May 15-21
127
387
617
May 22-28
150
315
445
May 29-31
85
142
313
MAY
673
1,637
2,484
Jun 1-7
177
592
1,639
Jun 8-14
136
345
472
Jun 15-21
154
416
523
Jun 22-28
123
329
410
Jun 29-30
40
429
3,405
JUN
630
2,111
6,449
Jul 1-7
120
589
635
Jul 8-14
129
242
316
Jul 15-21
123
168
272
Jul 22-28
115
234
366
Jul 29-31
43
95
119
JUL
530
1,328
1,708
Aug 1-7
109
342
255
Aug 8-14
121
176
245
Aug 15-21
155
388
392
Aug 22-28
134
269
312
Aug 29-31
55
88
172
AUG
574
1,263
1,376
Sep 1-7
119
341
381
Sep 8-14
125
197
313

Security By Province Sep 8-14, 2016
Province
Incidents
Anbar
13 Incidents
6 Killed: 1 Civilian, 5 ISF
2 Wounded: 2 ISF
11 Shootings
1 IED
1 Rockets
15 Suicide Bombers Killed
2 Car Bombs Destroyed
Babil
5 Incidents
2 Wounded: 2 ISF
3 IEDs
Baghdad
66 Incidents
121 Killed: 2 Hashd, 4 ISF, 4 Sahwa, 111 Civilians
272 Wounded: 4 Sahwa, 6 ISF, 11 Hashd, 251 Civilians
17 Shootings
31 IEDs
3 Sticky Bombs
1 Sound Bomb
3 Grenades
1 Suicide Bomber
1 Suicide Car Bomb
2 Suicide Bombers
Basra
3 Incidents
1 Killed: 1 Civilian
1 Shooting
2 IEDs
Diyala
13 Incidents
11 Killed: 3 Hashd, 8 Civilians
11 Wounded: 7 Peshmerga, 4 Civilians
1 Shooting
11 IEDs
1 Sound Bomb
1 Sticky Bomb
1 Suicide Bomber Arrested
1 Suicide Car Bomb
Kirkuk
9 Incidents
37 Killed: 37 Civilians
18 Wounded: 2 Peshmerga, 16 Civilians
9 IEDs
Ninewa
12 Incidents
13 Killed: 3 Peshmerga, 10 Civilians
6 Wounded: 3 Peshmerga, 3 Civilians
5 Shootings
9 IEDs
3 Mortars
7 Suicide Bombers Killed
16 Car Bombs Destroyed
Salahaddin
4 Incidents
8 Killed: 8 Civilians
1 Shooting
1 IED
2 Suicide Car Bombs Destroyed

Car Bombs In Iraq Sep 2016
Date
Car Bombs
Dead
Wounded
Sep 1



Sep 2



Sep 3
Shah Siwan, Salahaddin
7
8
Sep 4



Sep 5
Karrada, Baghdad
12
37
Sep 6



Sep 7



Totals
2 – 0 Destroyed
19
45
Sep 8



Sep 9
Palestine St, Baghdad
40
60
Sep 10



Sep 11



Sep 12
Mosul-Baghdad Road & Zaizaa, Ninewa – 9 destroyed


Sep 13
West & Thar Thar, Anbar – 2 destroyed
Khalis, Diyala – 1 destroyed
Houd, Ninewa – 7 destroyed


Sep 14
Shirqat & Telul Alpag, Ninewa – 2 destroyed


Totals
1 – 21 Destroyed
40
60

SOURCES

Buratha News, "The destruction of more than seven car bombs in repelling Daesh attack on Qayyarah south of Mosul," 9/12/16
- "Security forces destroyed Daesh explosives in security operation in southern Baghdad," 8/28/16

Al Forat, "Defense announces securing Tarmiya in Baghdad's northern belt," 8/29/16
- "Frustrated Daesh attack with two car bombs and found tunnels north Salahuddin," 9/14/16

Iraqi News, "ISIS launches offensive near Mosul, 100 members killed," 9/12/16
- "Nineveh Operations repulses ISIS 'invasion of Death' near Mosul," 9/13/16

Al Maalomah, "The arrest of a suicide bomber in the center of Khalis Diyala," 9/11/16

Al Mada, "Federal Police repel Daesh attack western Anbar," 9/13/16

NINA, "A number of terrorists killed during repulsing two attacks in Anbar," 9/13/16
- "Two attacks to Daesh foiled in northern Salah al-Din," 9/14/16

Pickard, Eric Scott, "Baghdad Mall Bombing In Iraq Kills At Least 40," Inquisitor, 9/11/16

Shafaq News, "Army repels a strong Daesh attack in Tal Afar area and kill 22, including suicide bombers," 9/12/16

Alsumaria, "A suicide car bomber killed near Baquba," 9/13/16